Faculty of Engineering Secondary School - Course Calendar

School philosophy and goals

The mission, vision, and values of the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Ottawa are at the core of the goals and philosophy of the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School.

The Faculty’s vision is to uniquely position itself as a leader in innovation and excellence in engineering and computer science through education, research and scholarship in a professional framework reflecting our social responsibility. This begins by reaching youth through targeted programmes and offering them meaningful, hands-on learning experiences. The Faculty of Engineering Secondary School is committed to offering an excellent learning environment that fosters innovation, collaboration, and creativity among all its students.

The mission of the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School is to provide students with an engaging and inclusive learning environment where they will feel empowered to think critically and solve problems collaboratively and creatively. We seek to provide students with enriching, positive experiences in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) that set them up for success. We aspire to give youth the choice of pursuing a career in STEM by allowing them to make informed, educated choices, rather than ones made out of fear of the unknown.

Along with the Faculty of Engineering, we share the institutional values of the University of Ottawa, most notably:

  • We place students at the core of our educational mission;
  • We are committed to a culture built on respect and fair treatment of the individual and to equal opportunities to our students and personnel;
  • We encourage freedom of expression, ethical behaviour, critical thinking, collegiality, transparency, and accountability.
  • We adhere to and demonstrate honesty and integrity in all the activities in which we engage;
  • We continuously strive to develop our knowledge, skills, and competence to better fulfill our education, research, and service responsibilities.

Student success

The Faculty of Engineering Secondary School is committed to the success of each of its students and understands the importance of having a positive, educational experience in secondary school. As such, every effort will be made to ensure that students are given the necessary instruction, support, and tools required to meet course expectations and achieve their academic goals. Furthermore, the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School offers educational programs that create relevant learning opportunities to better equip students in this digital age.

We understand that it is a shared effort from the school community as a whole, including teachers, parents, and students that can set up learners for success. Students play a big role in their own outcomes, and as such we expect all of our students to:

  • Follow the code of conduct and classroom rules
  • Attend school regularly and punctually
  • Be respectful of others, themselves, and class
  • Be accountable for their words, actions, and work
  • Work hard and put forth their best efforts
  • Ask for support when needed

Successful completion of a secondary education is an important and valuable step toward post-secondary opportunities. As lifelong learners, students may choose to continue their formal education through university, college, or apprenticeship programs. Alternatively, students may choose to pursue community living or workplace experiences after graduation. Whatever the pathway, a secondary education opens doors to all of these opportunities and provides students with basic skills necessary for everyday living.

Code of conduct

Our guiding principles are respect for self, respect for others and respect for the learning environment. We will work together to ensure that students learn in a tolerant, positive and supportive environment with a clear focus on learning.

  • Students will be punctual
  • Students will arrive to school prepared and ready to begin class
  • Students will wear appropriate clothing that covers their midriff and all undergarments; clothing worn at school must not contain inappropriate words or imagery
  • Students will be respectful of themselves and others
  • Students will show proper care and respect for the property of others, including the school’s property
  • Students will only use personal electronic devices in class with teacher permission
  • Students will only submit work that is their own, as cheating is not tolerated
  • Students will do their part to maintain a safe learning environment for all (no violence, no weapons, no harassment, no bullying)

Safe school policy

The Faculty of Engineering Secondary School abides by the University of Ottawa’s Violence Prevention Policy, Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination Policy, and Occupational Health and Safety Policy. As such, we are committed to:

  • maintaining a learning and work environment that promotes the understanding and respect for dignity of the person as part of the school community and one that is free from harassment, discrimination, and violence
  • protecting the school community and will take every precaution reasonable in the circumstances for the protection of a member and to prevent violence
  • taking appropriate preventative and corrective action where harassment or discrimination occurs

Attendance

Students who are six years old on or before the first day of school are required to attend school until they reach the age of eighteen or until they obtain their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).

Regular attendance in classes is an important factor in the academic success of students, especially in condensed summer courses.

When students are absent, they miss:

  1. material on which subsequent learning is based
  2. valuable time to work on projects
  3. evaluations given by teachers

Students are expected to attend every class and to be punctual. Skipping class (truancy) is unacceptable. The school will make every effort to inform parents of problems created by the irregular attendance of their children.

When a student is absent from school, a parent or guardian (if the student is under 18) must phone the school. If no telephone contact is made before the student returns to school, the student should have a note from a parent or guardian (if the student is under 18) which explains the absence. If a student needs to leave school early for an appointment or due to illness, the student must sign out.

Please note that regular attendance is an important component of success in all courses. Since our summer courses are condensed over a 2- or 4-week period, it is imperative that students make every effort to attend each class. Absences for medical or dental appointments and for long-term illnesses (more than 3 days) must be confirmed by a doctor’s certificate. If a student misses too many classes, he/she may not be able to complete a sufficient amount of the work assigned. As a result the student may fail to achieve credits for the course. It is at the discretion of the teacher and principal to determine if an absence is approved and if the student has attended enough classes to have successfully completed the course requirements.

Academic fraud

The Faculty of Engineering Secondary School at the University of Ottawa does not condone academic fraud, attempts to commit academic fraud, or involvement in academic fraud. The University of Ottawa defines academic fraud as any act by a student that may result in a distorted academic evaluation for that student or another student. Academic fraud includes but is not limited to activities such as:

  1. plagiarising in any way (such as taking and claiming another’s work as their own or improper referencing)
  2. cheating in any way (such as misrepresenting one’s work by copying from another source or allowing one’s work to be copied)
  3. submitting work not partially or fully one’s own, excluding properly cited quotations and references. Such work includes assignments, essays, tests, exams, presentations, and reports, regardless of whether the work is in written, oral or another form
  4. attributing a statement of fact or reference to a fabricated source
  5. falsifying or misrepresenting an academic evaluation, using a forged or altered supporting document or facilitating the use of such a document

Students who commit or attempt to commit academic fraud, or who are a party to academic fraud, may be subject to one or more of the following consequences:

  1. a disciplinary meeting with the teacher and/or school officials
  2. notification to student’s parents/guardians
  3. student completion of an alternative assignment
  4. zero for part of the work in question
  5. zero for the work in question

School schedule

Currently the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School is operational just during the summer term, offering three courses. 

2019 school schedule

Each course runs for four weeks from Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. (with the exception of civic holidays) with an hour for lunch.

  • Exploring Technological Design - TDJ1O: July 29-August 23, 2019
  • Introduction to Computer Studies – ICS2O: July 2-26, 2019
  • Introduction to Computer Science - ICS3U:J uly 29-August 23, 2019

The lunch hour will be supervised for elementary students who are taking a secondary reach-ahead course; this pertains to students who have just completed grade 8 in June 2019.

Report cards will be distributed to parents and the students’ host schools at the end of each summer term.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma

The requirements for earning an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) are as follows:

  • students must earn a minimum of 30 credits, including 18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits
  • students must meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement
  • students must complete 40 hours of community involvement activities

Compulsory credits

Students must earn the following compulsory credits to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma:

  • 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade; A maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language, ESL, or English literacy development, ELD, may be counted towards the 4 compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course.)
  • 3 credits in mathematics (1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
  • 2 credits in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in the arts
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in French as a second language
  • 0.5 credit in career studies
  • 0.5 credit in civics

Plus one credit from each of the following groups:

Group 1:

  1. English or French as a second language (In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3.)
  2. a Native language
  3. a classical or an international language
  4. social sciences and the humanities
  5. Canadian and world studies
  6. guidance and career education
  7. cooperative education (A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits.)

Group 2:

  1. health and physical education
  2. the arts
  3. business studies
  4. French as a second language (In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3.)
  5. cooperative education (A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits.)

Group 3:

  1. science (Grade 11 or 12)
  2. technological education
  3. French as a second language (In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3.)
  4. computer studies
  5. cooperative education (A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits.)

Optional credits

In addition to the 18 compulsory credits, students must complete 12 optional credits (which may include up to four credits achieved through approved Dual Credit Courses). These course may be selected from the full list of courses available in or through their host school. Optional credits allow students to build educational programs that suit their individual interests and meet university, college, apprenticeship, or work requirements.

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test

All students must successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) test in order to earn a secondary school diploma. This test is designed by the Ontario Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO). Students will normally be administered the literacy when they are in Grade 10. The test is based on Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication, particularly reading and writing, up to and including Grade 9. Students who write the test but do not succeed must retake the test and complete it successfully in order to qualify for a secondary school diploma. There is no limit to the number of times the test may be retaken.

Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC).  The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course was developed to provide students with intensive support in achieving the required reading and writing competencies, and with an alternative means of demonstrating their literacy skills. Students who are successful on the OSSLT test are not eligible to take the OSSLC (except under special circumstances, at the principal’s discretion).

Accommodations for the OSSLT may be made only for students with Individual Education Plans (IEPs), and in accordance with EQAO policies. Students whose Individual Education Plans indicate that they are not working towards a Secondary School Diploma may, with parental/guardian consent and the approval of the Principal, be exempted from writing the test.

Students who might benefit from deferral of the test may include those who have been identified as exceptional and students registered in English as a Second Language courses. Parents/guardians may request such deferral, or their host school, in consultation with Parents/Guardians, may initiate deferral. In order to achieve an Ontario Secondary School Diploma, deferred students must successfully complete the test.

Community involvement

Every Ontario student must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities as part of the requirements for an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). The purpose of the community involvement requirement is to encourage students to develop awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play and the contributions they can make in supporting and strengthening their communities.

Although this diploma requirement applies to students in Grades 9 to 12, students in Grade 8 will now be able to start accumulating community involvement hours in the summer before they enter Grade 9. For mature students, principals will determine the number of hours of community involvement activities required.

The community involvement is to be completed outside students’ normal instructional hours and in a variety of settings, as approved by the student’s school board. Should the student wish to complete their hours outside one of the approved settings, it Students may not complete the requirement through activities that are counted towards a credit, through paid work, or by assuming duties normally performed by a paid employee.

Documentation attesting to the completion of each activity must be submitted. This documentation must include for each activity: the name of the person or non-profit organization receiving the service, the activity performed, the dates and hours, signatures of the student and his or her parents, and a signed acknowledgement by the person (or representative of the organization) involved. Community involvement forms are generally made available for this purpose from the student’s host school board and/or host school.

Substitution policy

Principals may substitute up to three compulsory credits with courses from other subject areas specified in the list of compulsory credit requirements (including Groups 1, 2 and 3) outlined in section Compulsory Credits.

Two half-credit courses may be used through substitution to meet one compulsory credit requirement (counted as one substitution); one full-credit course may be used through substitution to meet the two compulsory half-credit requirements of civics and career studies (also counted as one substitution).

The decision to substitute one course for another for a student should be made only if the student’s educational interests are best served by such a substitution. If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests a substitution, the principal will determine whether the substitution should be made. A principal may also initiate consideration of whether a substitution should be made. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or the adult student and appropriate school staff. In all cases where the parent or the adult student disagrees with the decision of the principal, the parent or the adult student may ask the appropriate supervisory officer to review the matter.

The following are limitations on substitutions for compulsory credits:

  1. English as a second language and English literacy development courses may not be used to substitute for a compulsory credit. (They may be used, however, to meet the compulsory credit requirements for three English credits.)
  2. No more than one learning strategies course, from the guidance and career education curriculum policy document, may be used through substitution to meet a compulsory credit requirement.
  3. Credits earned for cooperative education courses may not be used through substitution to meet compulsory credit requirements.
  4. A locally developed compulsory credit (LDCC) course may not be used as a substitute for a compulsory credit; it may be used only to meet the compulsory credit requirement that it has been designed to meet.

Ontario Secondary School Certificate

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows.

7 required compulsory credits:

  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in mathematics
  • 1 credit in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history or Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in the arts, computer studies, or technological education

7 required optional credits:

  • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses

The substitution policy outlined above also applies to the Ontario Secondary School Certificate.

Certificate of Accomplishment

Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included.

Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses (including courses with modified or alternative expectations in special education programs) will have their transcript updated accordingly but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements.

Understanding Courses and Course Codes

All courses are identified by a 6-character code common to all secondary schools in Ontario.

Example

For example, TDJ1O is the code for the Grade 9 Open Technological Design course.

  • TDJ: The first three characters indicate the course title. These abbreviations are set by the Ministry.
  • 1: The fourth character indicates the grade level of the course.
  • O: The fifth character indicates the type of course.

Major subject areas:

  • A: The Arts
  • B: Business Studies
  • C: Canadian & World Studies
  • E: English
  • F: French
  • G: Guidance & Career Education
  • H: Social Studies & the Humanities
  • I: Computer Studies
  • I: Interdisciplinary Studies
  • K: Non-Credit Courses
  • L: Classical & International Languages
  • M: Mathematics
  • N: Native Studies
  • O: OSSLC
  • P: Physical & Health Education
  • S: Science
  • T: Technological Education

Grades

  • 1: Grade 9
  • 2: Grade 10
  • 3: Grade 11
  • 4: Grade 12

Languages

  • A: Level 1
  • B: Level 2
  • C: Level 3
  • D: Level 4
  • E: Level 5

Course type for grade 9 & 10

  • D: Academic
  • L: Locally Developed
  • O: Open
  • P: Applied

Course type for grade 11 & 12

  • C: College
  • E: Workplace
  • M: University/College
  • O: Open
  • U: University

School-designated

Credits

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours, and has been developed from a Ministry of Education curriculum guideline or has been approved by the Ministry. Half credits may also be offered, and the amount of scheduled time will be assigned accordingly (e.g., 55 hours required for a half-credit course).

Prerequisites

A prerequisite is a course that must be completed before being allowed entry into another course. Prerequisite courses help students to gain the knowledge and skills needed in later grade levels.

Types of Courses in Grade 9 & 10

Students in Grades 9 and 10 will make the choice between academic, applied and locally developed courses primarily on the basis of their learning styles, interests, levels of support needed and post-secondary goals. The selection of courses for exceptional students should also be guided by information in the student’s Individual Education Plan.

Academic courses

Academic compulsory courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problem-solving. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate. They provide the background for the grade 11 and 12 university preparation courses.

Applied courses

Applied compulsory courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject, and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. They provide the background for college preparation courses. Students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study.

Locally developed courses

Locally Developed compulsory courses focus on the knowledge and skills that students need to be well prepared for success in grades 11 and 12 Workplace Preparation Courses. Opportunities to develop, enhance, and practice literacy, and mathematical literacy processes, concepts, skills and strategies are the focus of the expectations in these courses.

Open courses

Open courses are designed to prepare students for further study in a subject, and to enrich their education generally. These courses comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students in a given grade and are not tied to a particular post-secondary destination.

Types of Courses in Grade 11 & 12

Students in grades 11 and 12 will choose from among four destination-related course types: University Preparation, University/College Preparation, College Preparation, and Workplace Preparation. Open courses are also offered in Grades 11 and 12. Students will make their choices based on their post-secondary goals, interests, achievement, and career goals.

It is very important that students choose courses for the appropriate destination in order to ensure their interest and their success. University/College (M) and University (U) courses, for example, emphasize theoretical knowledge and application. Workplace (E) and College (C) courses include more practical, concrete examples and applications.

University preparation courses

University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. An emphasis is placed on theoretical knowledge and supporting application in the course content as well as the development of independent research and learning skills.

University/College preparation courses

University/College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the 2018-2019 Secondary Course Calendar 17 entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges. These courses place emphasis on both the theoretical aspects of the course content and the practical applications.

College preparation courses

College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the requirements for entrance to most college programs or for admission to apprenticeship or other training programs. These courses focus on concrete applications of the concepts and theories that are studied and help to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Workplace preparation courses

Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to enter the workplace directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs. They emphasize practical skills and stress the importance of lifelong learning.

Open courses

Open courses are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and to prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of universities, colleges, or the workplace in mind.

Courses Offered at the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School

Exploring Technological Design (TDJ1O)

Exploring Technological Design is an open grade 9 course. Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on design experience right at the Faculty of Engineering.

The course is four weeks long. Students who successfully complete the course will gain a full credit toward their secondary school diploma.

This exploratory course introduces students to concepts and skills related to technological design, which involves the development of solutions to various design challenges and the fabrication of models or prototypes of those solutions. Students will develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues, and will begin to explore secondary and post-secondary pathways leading to careers in the field.

Exploring Technological Design - TDJ1O will have a strong focus on the design process, 3D drafting, 3D modelling, and 3D printing.

Introduction to Computer Studies (ICS2O)

Introduction to Computer Studies (ICS2O) is an open grade 10 course. Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on programming experience right at the Faculty of Engineering.

The course is four weeks long. Students who successfully complete the course will gain a full credit toward their secondary school diploma.

Through this course, students will explore the basics of computer hardware and software as well as fundamental programming concepts. Guided by an industry professional, students will create code for modern hardware systems. This program will help students become aware of the ethics of technology and its impact on society.

Introduction to Computer Studies – ICS2O will have a strong focus on the implementation of embedded systems with technologies such as the Raspberry Pi.

Introduction to Computer Science (ICS3U)

Introduction to Computer Science (ICS3U) is a pre-university grade 11 course. Students enrolled in this course will gain hands-on software design experience right at the Faculty of Engineering.

The course is four weeks long. Students who successfully complete the course will gain a full credit toward their secondary school diploma.

This course will provide students an immersive hands-on experience in the world of computer science, exploring the basics of software development through the implementation of various software projects involving HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Instructed by an industry professional, students will be brought up to speed with modern programming tools and the agile software-development cycle. This program will help students become aware of the various career opportunities offered in the domains of computer science and software engineering.

Introduction to Computer Science - ICS3U will have a strong focus on the integration of both hardware and software systems with technologies such as the Raspberry Pi.

Outlines of courses of study

The outlines of courses of study for the courses offered at the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School can be found on the school’s website.

Ontario curriculum policy documents

Please review the following policy documents for more information regarding the Ontario curriculum:
The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Technological Education, 2009 (revised)
The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 10 to 12: Computer Studies, 2008 (revised)

Experiential learning programs

Experiential Learning includes all planned learning experiences that take place outside of the classroom including co-operative education, work experience, job twinning and job shadowing. This unique form of learning can assist all students (including exceptional students) to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are essential in today’s society. Regardless of the post-secondary destination students choose (apprenticeship, college, community living, university or the workplace), Experiential Learning can help them to make key decisions and potential career choices.

Cooperative Education

Cooperative education programs allow students to earn secondary school credits while completing a work placement in the community. These programs complement students’ academic programs and are valuable for all students, whatever their post-secondary destination. The cooperative education course consists of a classroom component and a placement component. The classroom component includes pre-placement sessions and classroom integration sessions. Placements require a personalized placement learning plan and are monitored by a cooperative education teacher.

In their cooperative education program, students may earn a minimum of one and a maximum of two cooperative education credits for each related course, whether it is a full- or half-credit course. If the related course is a multiple-credit course, a student may earn a maximum of two co-op credits for each credit earned in the related course. Up to two credits earned through cooperative education can count toward the 18 compulsory credits needed for an Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Work experience

Work experience is a component of a course that provides students with a learning opportunity in the workplace for a limited period of time, from one to four weeks. It forms an integral part of a specific credit course and requires a pre-placement orientation as well as learning plan.

Job shadowing and job twinning

Job shadowing and job twinning may be offered to students from Grade 7 to Grade 12 as part of curriculum delivery and as part of the career development program. Job shadowing allows a student to spend one-half to one day (or, in some cases, up to three days) observing a worker in a specific occupation. Job twinning provides the opportunity for the student to observe a cooperative education student at his or her placement for one-half to one day.

Course withdrawal

Grades 9 and 10

Withdrawals from Grade 9 and 10 courses are not recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST). Only successfully completed courses are recorded on the OST.


Grades 11 and 12

If a student withdraws from a course half-way through the instructional time (i.e. after 10 instructional days for a full-credit summer course), the withdrawal will be communicated to the student’s host school and may be recorded on the student’s OST. The student’s percentage grade at the time of the withdrawal will be communicated as well. Withdrawals prior to that time are not recorded.

Course changes

Course change requests will only be considered for a valid reason, as determined by the principal. The school may consider a course change request for reasons including: changes in level of difficulty, timetable errors, changes in career plans, or post-secondary admission requirements, medical accommodations. All requests for course changes are subject to approval and space available in courses.

Course cancellation

Course registrations may be cancelled and refunded up to two weeks prior to the start date of the registered course. However, a $30 administrative fee will be charged for every refund. Refunds will not be offered for cancellations made with less than two weeks’ notice prior to the course start date.

Prior learning assessment and recognition processes

Since the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School does not operate as a host school, it does implement the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition Process (PLAR), however the student’s host school may implement PLAR which would allow students to obtain credits for knowledge and skills they have acquired outside of school. This prior learning is assessed and evaluated to determine whether the student has met the provincial course expectations.

Students may challenge a specific course for credit if they can provide evidence indicating achievement of the overall expectations and a likelihood of success. For regular day school students, a maximum of 4 credits may be granted through the challenge process for Grade 10, 11, and 12 courses. No more than 2 of these credits may be granted in one discipline. Students who have credentials from other jurisdictions may apply for equivalency in order to be granted those credits.

The student should be prepared to provide reasonable substantive evidence for success in the challenge process (e.g. a portfolio, documentation of related course-work, recommendation from a teacher, etc.). Furthermore, the student may be required to demonstrate achievement of the overall course expectations, as outlined in the curriculum documents, through formal tests, including exams and assignments, and other assessment strategies appropriate for the particular course. Students who are successful in the challenge assessment will receive a final percentage grade and a credit for the course.

Alternative credit-granting opportunities

There are a variety of ways to earn secondary school credits outside the traditional classroom-learning environment. E-learning is offered by school boards as a way for students to learn credits through online courses. E-learning allows students more flexibility in terms of the types of courses offered and times in which they are offered; students are not limited by the courses available in their geographical area. E-learning also provides an alternative format for the delivery of courses that can better meet students’ needs.

Continuing education (such as adult education, evening credit courses, and summer school) supports learners of all ages by allowing them to take reach-ahead, remedial, language, literacy, and general-interest courses. They are offered at the Faculty of Engineering Secondary School through summer courses. Summer school must begin after the last day of the academic year (usually in June) and must end before the start of the new school year (often in September).
Independent study is another way in which a student can gain credits without attending traditional classroom lessons. Independent study involves the student being excused from attending regular classes in order to student independently during his/her own time, but under the supervision of the teacher. Courses delivered through the Independent Learning Centre may contribute to an independent study.

Private study involves a student who has been excused from attending class for a valid reason, or has been granted permission study independently, given that the school does not offer the course. Generally a student may be permitted to take just one to two private study courses and the school must monitor the student’s progress as well as evaluate his/her work. Courses delivered through the Independent Learning Centre may contribute to a private study program.

Assessment, evaluation, and reporting

Assessment, evaluation, and reporting of student achievement will be based on the policies and practices outlined in the following Ministry’s policy document Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools, 2010.

Levels of achievement are defined as follows, according to Ministry documents:

Level Percentage Achievement
Level 1 50—59% Represents achievement that falls much below the provincial standard. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with limited effectiveness. Students must work at significantly improving learning in specific areas, as necessary, if they are to be successful in the next grade/course
Level 2 60—69% Represents achievement that approaches the provincial standard. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with some effectiveness. Students performing at this level need to work on identified learning gaps to ensure future success
Level 3 70—79% Represents the provincial standard for achievement. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with considerable effectiveness. Parents of students achieving at level 3 can be confident that their children will be prepared for work in subsequent grades/courses.
Level 4 80—100% Identifies achievement that surpasses the provincial standard. The student demonstrates the specified knowledge and skills with a high degree of effectiveness. However, achievement at level 4 does not mean that the student has achieved expectations beyond those specified for the grade/course.

Students will be evaluated based on the overall expectations of the course through the achievement charts in the Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents for the courses in which they are enrolled. Evaluation is based on the level of achievement the student demonstrates on the overall expectations of a course.

Students will be given a variety of opportunities to demonstrate the full extent of their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four categories of knowledge and skills:

  1. Knowledge and understanding: Subject-specific content acquired in each grade/course (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding)
  2. Thinking: The use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes
  3. Communication: The conveying of meaning through various forms
  4. Application: The use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts

Seventy percent (70%) of the evaluation is based on daily classroom work and will be determined through a variety of methods, such as ongoing class conversations, demonstrations, teacher observations, assignments, and classroom tests and quizzes.

Teachers will use “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning” practices to help students identify: where they are in relation to the learning goals and what next steps they need to take to achieve the goals.

This ongoing feedback will help prepare students for “assessment of learning”, the process of collecting and interpreting evidence for the purpose of summarizing learning at a given point in time, to make judgments about the quality of student learning on the basis of established criteria, and to assign a value to represent that quality.

Thirty percent (30%) of the evaluation occurs at or near the end of the course. This evaluation will be based on evidence from one or a combination of performance tasks, writing tasks or other methods of evaluation suitable to the course expectations. This final evaluation allows the student the opportunity to demonstrate comprehensive achievement of the overall expectations of the course.

At the conclusion of each summer term, a summary of courses attempted and credits gained will be sent to the student’s host school such that they can be maintained in each student's Ontario Student Transcript. Courses will be entered under the common course code and the percentage obtained will be reported.

Each student’s formal report card will be sent to parents/guardians by the end of summer term. Teachers will contact parents midway through the course if there is cause for concern regarding their child’s academic achievement. Parents are invited to contact the school at any time to get an update on the progress of their child.

Supports and resources

Students will be given access to necessary course equipment, computer laboratories and/or laptops outside of school hours to continue their learning outside of the classroom. It is the student’s responsibility to take advantage of these resources in order to practice the skills taught during instructional hours.

Should students have special needs that require accommodations; upon request a meeting will take place between the student and a learning specialist at the Student Academic Success Service (SASS) for the purposes of a needs analysis. Medical documentation may be required as well. Once the teacher has been informed of the student’s accommodation needs, every effort will be made to ensure that the student has the necessary tools and services to succeed in their courses. Accommodations may take place in three forms: environmental, instructional, and assessment.

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