Genius ideas and ingenious solutions at Design Day

Posted on Monday, December 3, 2018

Journée du design, automne 2018 | Fall Design Day 2018

In the first ever Fall edition of Design Day, the STEM Complex’s first floor was filled with over 350 participants in over 60 teams, each showcasing their design projects.

Within the context of specific design courses, these mostly first- and second-year students were tasked to come up with innovative solutions for real clients faced with real problems. Joining the students were over 25 judges, hailing from academia, industry and government, to help determine the winners of Design Day.

Each project fit within one of the following categories:

  • Accessible designs to improve lives of people living with disabilities
  • Environmental robots to reduce pollution
  • Devices for forensics investigations – Ottawa Police Service
  • Greenhouses for indigenous communities
  • Open category

We weren’t the only ones excited about this event. Design Day caused quite a stir on social media and, to help you get caught up, we’ve rounded up some of the best posts and snapshots from the day. Be sure to check them out at the bottom of this page!

Congratulations to the winning teams!

Hazmat Bowie (A4)

Accessible design

1st place - Phaneuf (FA9)

  • Luc Alari
  • Jasen Lee
  • Julien Philippot
  • Alexandre Séguin

2nd place - Handisan (B3C)

  • Basel Alsaadi
  • Mabroor Kamal
  • Justin Lannin-Roy
  • Nicholas Schmidt

3rd place - A9

  • David Coyne
  • Lawrence Eddie
  • Mary-Kate Jory
  • Noah Renkema

Environmental robot

Hazmat Bowie (A4)

  • Toby Easterbrook
  • Andre Frenette
  • Jordan Hilko
  • Dominique Negm
  • Carlo Padilla

Devices for forensic investigations

FA7

  • Imane Amraoui
  • Oumnia Amraoui
  • Gaelle Moal
  • Adrianna Schwarzer
  • Madyng Tounkara

Greenhouses

Octa (C2)

  • Matthew Babineau
  • Harith De Costa
  • Nelson Hidocos Jr
  • Mostafa Khafagy
  • Zane Macdonald
  • Aya Sassi

Open category

Vein (O5)

  • Abdulwahaab Ahmed
  • Anita Popescu

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