Isabelle Catelas is recognized for outstanding research in orthopaedic issues related to the hip

Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2017

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The prestigious William H. Harris, MD Award is awarded for outstanding scientific achievement of a paper submitted to the Orthopaedic Research Society.

The prestigious William H. Harris, MD Award has being given to Professor Isabelle Catelas in recognition of the outstanding quality and scientific achievement of a paper submitted to the Orthopaedic Research Society Awards and Recognition Committee.

In late March 2017 during the Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS), Professor Catelas received the award “for outstanding work in orthopaedic research related to the hip.” The ORS Annual Meeting was held in San Diego, CA. The William Harris Award is being given to you in recognition of the outstanding quality and scientific achievement of the paper you submitted to the review committee entitled “Differential Proteomic Analysis of Hip Synovial Fluid from Patients with a Pseudotumor vs. Periprosthetic Osteolysis.”

Professor Catelas joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Ottawa in May 2008, with a cross-appointment at the Faculty of Medicine. As a Canada Research Chair holder (Tier II), in “Bioengineering in Orthopaedics,” her research interests include the study of implant wear particles, their biological effects and possible approaches to modulate these effects, as well as bone regeneration.

About William H. Harris, MD
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The contributions of William H. Harris, MD, to total hip replacement are vast and range from the identification of the nature of osteolysis to the development of surgical techniques and implants. He invented the cement gun which replaced finger packing and improved cementing technique. He designed the first modular metal-backed acetabular component, which gave surgeons the ability to replace the polyethylene liner without having to remove the entire component. Dr. Harris successfully performed the first total hip replacement in a patient with a total congenital dislocation of the hip. In addition, he designed implants specifically for these patients. Today, these procedures are no longer unusual.

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